Wednesday, August 24, 2011

M,W,F 11am class

48 comments:

Bethzabe Vasquez said...

Libya’s actual political situation is justified since Gaddafi’s government, based on theocratic socialism has been attempting against the Libyans’ freedom since 1969. Since the beginning of his revolution he gained that much power due to several reason, Libya had recently established itself, since 1949 as an independent country, which is just 20 years of freedom before Gaddafi took the power; as a country, Libya didn’t have that much time to stabilize its economical, social and political situation. The fact that Gaddafi used their religion as a support of its revolution helped him to control the country faster, back in those days, but also is one of the main reasons why he lost it now. Globalization and influences from other countries had made Libyans aware and overwhelmed about their regimen. Revolutions had been happening around the world, from Asia to America and always involve dramatic changes during the revolution. Even though, as Mark Quarterman argues, it’s true that chaos and instability will make it much harder for Libyans to reestablish a new political system, I think that this revolution is the first step for them to make progress as a democratic country. Among history we can evaluate different scenarios that involve revolution and their actual situations nowadays. Revolutions against monarchies or dictators had happened in several countries with extremely different cultures (Asians, Americans, Europeans, etc) and none of those countries were prepared to set up a new perfect government, every country learned by its own mistakes. I do think that there are all the hopes possible for this revolution, changes take decades to actually see a notary progress and Libya is a rich oil country which helps it with its economical situation.

Daniel Balarezo said...

Libya’s rebellious victory over the former Libyan leader, Muammar Gaddafi, marks a significant achievement in the recent events of the Arab Uprisings of North Africa and the Middle East, and shows that the power of the people, when gathered for a common goal, can bring about change. Social Media and support from the United Nations were imperative in the success of the nation. Images last week of citizens decapitating Gaddafi’s statute in Tripoli was synonymous with images from 2003 in which Iraqi’s had done the same to Saddam Hussein’s statue in Baghdad, Iraq. What makes this event unique compared to the other countries currently involved in so called revolutions is the actual overthrow of the government. Libya is currently one of three countries, to include Tunisia and Egypt, which has successfully toppled the regimes of its suppressing dictators. The success of bringing about lasting social, economic, and political change is going to be a challenge to the people of the revolution, and in order for it to be obtainable the National Transition Council will have to act quickly to bring about a form of government that is vastly different from which they have just overthrown.

Ashereka Pierre said...

Among all the counties on this earth Libya is not in fact a very important one but what makes there event unique is that this revolution was the real deal and far from being on the brink of another quagmire,Libya is well placed to be the most successful of the Arab uprisings While in Tunisia and Egypt the tentacles of the old elite continue to stifle real change, Libya offers the opportunity to build from scratch, from a new constitution down to redrawing oil and construction contracts.Libya will find itself in an enviable situation economically. Politically and socially, the routing of the old regime will ensure that a free Libya will begin its new era with a completely clean slate; but only time can tell.
The achievement of the courageous Libyans who have fought to regain control over their own country and their own lives. But their success won't help us make progress on a lot of other big issues in world politics, and we ought to keep that in mind too.Its somewhat surprising to see how far they actually made it; but its nice to see the rebels triumph, and to have hope that they defy expectations and manage to build a new and reliably democratic Libyan state.

Michael Toussaint said...

Libya first announced its independence n december 24, 1951. At the time, King Idris I came to rule over Libya. It was named the United Libyan Kingdom. It was also relinquished by Italy February 10, 1947 from the U.K. And France under the U.N. Trustee ship. Libya like other countries, has gone through more than one revolution. The revolution, which occurred before this 2011 one, was a revolt, led by a young colonel named Mmuammar Gaddafi, who was 27 at the time, to over throw King Idris , with a Coup D'etat in 1969. He ran the country with a firm foot on the ground. He supposedly sent out assignments to assassinate. Of 25 potentially critical refugees since 1980-1987. He also allegedly ordered bombings and killings of protesters. With that being, Libya has undergone a number of revolution, but who is to say the outcome or success from these revolutions. A revolution is defined as an overthrown or repudiation and the thorough replacement f an established government or political system by the people governed. Gaddafi was not as bad as a leader as his reputation, from the media, and other country's leaders, would make him appear to be. With his power came an extension in welfare, minimum wage, affordable housing, and support to the schooling systems, which included colleges, with the help of the wealth Libya had obtain from oil. Gaddafi gave control back f Libya back to the Libyans. He provided and practiced socialism. He was praised by Nelson Mandela for the aid to the anti-imperialist movement. It is clear that Libyans benefited more from his power than when the corrupt monarchy of King idris was in power. Gaddafi set the government system to a socialist one. But since the arrest of Faithi Terbii, attorney for human rights, the people began t rebel against the government and spark riots and protests. Rebels were attacked, some killed, by pro-government members. Gaddafi "suppressed" as the media calls it, the protesters, with the use of violence. The overthrow of Gaddafi, could lead to a reformed government. With the influence of western government, perhaps it may be possible for Libya to be ran by a democratic government. The people feel that Gaddafi is abusing his power so they over threw him. The success of the revolution can only be developed by time. Hopefully they don't sell out one of the world's largest oil reserves. Hopefully the motto "Freedom, Socialism, and Utility" still remains relevant.

Linda Caicedo said...

Although I do believe that a violent revolt by the people is not always the best course of action, it is understandable that the Libyan people feel compelled to resort to such drastic behavior. They reacted in a reasonable manner to their basic civil rights being constantly violated under Gaddafi’s rule. It is unthinkable in our country that a person would be mutilated or hung just for expressing their opposition towards the President. Aside from the countless deaths resulting from the brutal punishments imposed by Gaddafi, his reckless spending of the country’s oil income on military weaponry destroyed Libya’s economy, leaving many infuriated, I’m sure. While I do agree that it is necessary for some sort of peace agreement in the future between the opposing forces, I hope that the people’s revolution is powerful enough to overthrow Gaddafi and punish him for the 40 years of torment he brought upon the Libyans

Patricia Useche said...

Even though Libya is the richest country of the North African countries, the unemployment rates for young people is very high and for most of the people basic needs cannot be meet. By 1969 Muamar el Gadafi helped to overturn the monarchy of King Idris by a coup d’etat and since then he has been in charge of the country, creating what he called the “third universal theory”, a form of government between capitalism and communism. In order for a country to start a revolution, the degree of dissatisfaction among the people has to be high, and that is what is currently going on in Libya. People are no longer willing to live in poor conditions, knowing that their country is a rich one. They don’t want to live under a communism and they want their rights to be respected. I believe that this revolution is the first step for Libyans to know what living in a democracy is. Fighting for rights is the right thing to do for every human being.

Matias Carrion said...

I believe that the Libyan revolution was a great thing; Gaddafi was abusing his power and everyone beneath him and needed to be removed in order for Libya to grow. When Gaddafi assumed power from king Idris he was looking to reshape the country in his image like many revolutionaries like him before, but what changed Libya wasn’t the revolution it was what he did with the power after it, he abused his control hurting Libya and slowing down its progress. With Gaddafi out of power now Libya needs to focus on creating some sort of constitution and begin adapting to the new form of government so it doesn’t follow the same path that Gaddafi had because he shaped the country in his image instead of what the people needed and wanted. I believe there is hope for this revolution as long as they continue to move forward in establishing a new government the Libyan people will be fine, but the problem with many revolutions is that they begin with a desire for change and equal rights but along the way they become corrupt with their own ideals, money or personal religious opinions. Gaddafi didn’t begin with the desire to become a corrupt dictator but his choices while forming a new regime corrupted him like many before him when given so much power all of the sudden. The new Libyan government should step cautiously and take baby steps toward building a new government so they can avoid corruption that hurt them before.

DarkChocolate said...

A revolution is needed for change. If a country is rule by a dictator for over four decades such as Muammar Gaddafi then it's only right for the citizens of that country to revolt thereby running him out of office. No human being human rights should be violated as Gaddafi did to the Libyan people. Libya has the ten highest proven oil reserves of any country in world and the seventeen highest petroleum productions. Putting Libya on the map as a rich country but under Gaddafi ruling the country's schools, hospitals, roads, ports, sewer systems and other facilities have been badly deteriorated. Libya has been in a poor economic state and needs to rebuild from scratch. When the Libyan people demonstrated peaceful protests the government ignore the citizens pleads and peaceful demands resulting in injuries and hospitalizations. So to get the government to hear them they had to go through extreme measurement to succeed what they have today. Time was up for Gaddafi and he knew it how the Libyan people finally were able to group together in large number to over throw him. It was awesome that there is arrest warrant out for Gaddafi. Libya displayed to the other countries that if a country comes together as one, they can succeed towards democracy.

Janet Arzola Perez said...

The Libyan revolution is a revolving armed conflict in the North Africa state of Libya being fought between forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi and his regime and those seeking to depose of him. Turning into a rebellions force focused on bringing down the regime that oppresses them. It is not an insult to the courageous actions of the rebels, but a reflection of the fact that military effectiveness requires training and organization in which they do not possess The protests against Mammary Gadhafi's rule illustrate an interesting policy phenomenon, where the international response to a government's violence against its own people seems to be based on the quality of the political relationship between that governments. . The protesters themselves may have also been violent, but this question does not seem to be asked very often; they certainly turned very violent, because the government forces had to exert a military effort to reclaim territories claimed by the rebellion. Gaddafi abused of his power, and the Libyan people have to be antagonized by the fact that they are one on the richest countries and yet Gaddafi has his country living beggarly. Libya shows a great deal of courage and desire for change, I only wish that they would get the rights they deserve and what they are fighting for.

Supitcha Saengkrajang said...

I’m not big on politic and have very little knowledge about it. But from what I have read and researched about the Libyan situation, I learned that they are undergoing a big change. Their country is basically one of the richest countries in the region because it is rich in oil. But a very large amount percentage of Libyan people are living under a very poor condition because all wealth goes to the pockets of Gaddafi, Libyan’s dictator, and his family. In my opinion, Libya has a horrible dictator. A few years back Gaddife broadcasted the hanging of many innocent men who simply spoke against his regime on Libyan TV. It was to scare Libyans to keep the words on the inside. The way the city is being govern is only based on its dictator. There are absolutely no freedom of speech. Despite all the violence, there will be big changes in the middle east though. Since Libya has huge amount of the oil reserves, they represent a great deal of economic power. I believe it will lead into another big war and America would have no choice but to get involve in it. If the country is allowed to continue under the govern of Gaddafi, there will be a legitimate revolution. Then there will be a powerful block developed on the tip of Africa that no nations would have any control over. But the world must get rid of dictators in order to make earth a better place to live for everyone.

khalid said...

Oppression has an expiry date. After a while the oppressed just get fed up, and act upon their frustrations. Let the Arab revolutions stand as a warning to oppressors all over the world. Sooner or later, your rule will come to a grinding sudden halt. What happened in Libya is long over due. We are talking about one of the potentially richest countries in the world, being abused by a tyrannical ruler whose ego is much larger than the lame excuse for a brain in his head. He has been draining Libya’s recourses and has been the only one eating from the fruits the great country has to offer. It is time for Libya’s money to be invested in the Libyan peoples. They deserve an adequate life in their country, which includes free education, health care, and a chance at prosperity. Much like their fellow Arabs in the Gulf, they can afford it. The National Transitional Council has a duty to the people of Libya. Likewise, the Libyan people and the Arabs as a whole have duty towards their great country. They have an opportunity to start fresh, without greed, without suppression, and rule with fairness. Let their voices be heard, let the next generation steer Libya towards its full potential. Stability will take time, although the building process of a nation is always a great experience. We will see innovation, and a foundation for a prosperous system be put in place. It is time for the Libyan people to decide for themselves where they want their country to go. As an Arab Muslim, I am proud to see my brothers and sisters across the Middle East, rising and pushing for change. It is finally time for a change, not just to oust suppressive leaders that push their agendas and the West’s, but also for a chance to go back to our roots, and rediscover what made the Middle East great. I hope in the near future, the rest of the leaders will be shown the door, and every single countries people including the Palestinians will receive the justifications and ratifications they deserve.

Felton Pierre said...

After the fall of Hosni Mubarak on February 11, 2011, the Arab Spring seemed an unrelenting force. In the weeks following his downfall, three theaters of major rebellion—Libya, Yemen, Bahrain—quickly emerged. Mass demonstrations demanding significant political reform continued, or sprang up in countries such as Jordan, Algeria, Morocco, Mauritania, Djibouti, Palestine, and Oman. Recently, these tremors have even affected Saudi Arabia and Syria.
Should the Arab revolution express make its next train stop in Libya, it will be greeted by an already horrific bloodbath, one that has transformed a peaceful revolution into armed resistance. Just as former-Romanian President Nicolae Ceausescu’s violent ouster two decades previously was the glaring exception to otherwise peaceful transitions in Eastern Europe, so too is Libya the glaring exception to the largely peaceful Arab revolts that have taken place over the last several months. While this difference is real, the underlying dynamics of the Libyan revolution nonetheless retain powerful similarities with those that were at play in Tunisia and Egypt. In all three instances, spontaneity, rather than established organizational structures or leadership, was the key element.
Libyan society over the last decade has become more modern than its regime. As in Tunisia and Egypt, what galvanized the Libyan revolution was autocratic deafness to this fact. Gaddafi’s government had a structural inability to hear the peoples’ grievances, to understand them as little more than childish noise, rather than as demands for fundamental political change. As such, all of the Arab revolutions, Libya’s included, should be seen as symptoms of an established social modernity, fortified by high rates of education, various communication technologies, and vibrant youth populations, whose economic and political expectations have been profoundly frustrated by a monopolistic, closed and antiquated governing style. These revolutions, whether peaceful or otherwise, have been borne out of a realization that such systems, having never before seen any need for reform, cannot now be entrusted to follow-through on sudden promises to improve their citizens’ political, social, and economic plights.
Contrary to what some may think, the Libyan revolution does not indicate that the inevitable regional transformation will necessarily become dominated by violence. In fact, the revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt, and now Yemen, have demonstrated the vast benefits of non-violence in the face of regime brutality. Nonetheless, in some cases, fundamental change comes only in the form of a gradual deconstruction of autocratic regimes—internal and slow, but displayed enough to be both perceptible and credible. Whatever the precise dynamics of change, it remains unlikely that any of the old Arab regimes will survive the Arab Spring in its current form: as they exist now, their static structure simply contradicts the dynamic modernity of their societies.

Cesar Pictac said...

The Revolution began in the month of february,it was inspired by the revolution in egypt and Tunisia, which ended with the governments of Hosni Mubarak and Zine El Abidine Ben AlĂ­ respectively.

When the libyan people realized that these revolutions were successful, they decided to overthrow their own president, which was the longest-president in charge throughout africa.

The people decided that was time for a big chance, and they decide to start the revolution.

Recently, the rebels who started the revolution, made it into the libyan capital(tripoli), but almost lost the war because of the deficiencies in the international help, even though the NATO helped a little bit, but the ambition of the imperialistic countries limited the help.

Governants like Hugo Chavez and Daniel Ortega, showed their support to the gadafi's government, just because of the "friendship" between these countries, in which the only only objective is the black gold...

Because of injustices like that one, the lybian revolution is in danger of being defeated, where fake aliances between countries, petroleum and money are more important than human beings. So its considered as a small price to pay if they want to have lower prices in oil and other things which is unintelligible.

But gadafi is losing the battle, and the war is close to its end, because the rebels have taken over the capital, so everithing is going to end there, thanks to some organizations as the NATO are offering some help, this bloody struggle is close to its end and the start of a new government is almost a real idea, where people are not going to get killed, if they complaing about the
government.

This is an inspiration, for the rest of the countries that are living the same problems as lybia, and maybe in the near future, some of those countries are going to begin a revolution too.

Karina Saenz said...

Although it's not going to be easy for the Libyans to adjust to all the changes their country will experience, this is a new beginning for them. I believe a revolution had to take place in order to end this dictatorship, and that is exactly what the people of Lybia did. These people are fighting for what they deserve and that is their freedom. For 42 years, Gadaffi ruled over the country and forced the Libyans to accept his views and beliefs, using the "Green Book" as the foundation of his ruling. The laws he created only benefitted him and his family, and ruined the rest of the people. He consumed Lybia's riches, and as the country became poorer, he became wealthier. Gadaffi slaughtered many people that opposed to his government. If anyone dared to disagree with his ideas, they would have to pay with their lives. Not only was Gadaffi a murderer, but he was also accused of financing and supporting terrorist groups. With all this said, it was finally time for the Libyans to take charge, and recover the rights they had lost for so many years. The hope to see their country progress is what keeps the people of Lybia motivated.

Carmelo Infante said...

The course of action that the rebels in Libya have taken is much more than just justified but necessary. Muammar Gaddafi came in in 1959 and got rid off the Libyan constitution and replaced it with one made up of his own ideology. He ran the country in a way that all of his most trusted followers like family and close friends controlled all aspects of the government. The corruption that this man brought is unacceptable. Instead of using the country’s oil income to develop the country further, He used most of the country’s oil income to grow his vast fortune. I say that this revolution has come not a minute too late. The rebels must be tired of the countless deaths imposed by his rule and the destruction of their economy to fund his lifestyle and increase his artillery. There basic civil rights which have been constantly violated by Muammar Gaddafi deserve to be enforced. More of Libya’s citizens do not deserve to die for the greed of one man and they deserve to have rights.

carlos mena said...

In my opinion out of the three revolutions that took place, the Libyan revolution is the one that actually has a chance at achieving any kind of significant change. Osman Bakach a member of the liberation party said in an interview that the regimes that were toppled were remnants of old colonial orders and that those who were removed from power in Tunisia and Egypt just handed power over to another member of the same regime which have ties to the west. In contrast to those situations the Libyans have a power vacuum with no real political front runner and in that sense they are fighting for true independence. Revolution in these Muslim countries should not come as a surprise to anyone in my opinion these events were a long time coming, forty years of oppression and financial inequality is too long for a society of people to sit around and just swallow that pill. The youth movement of Libya did its part in informing the world and raising awareness for their cause something that maybe older Muslims would have hesitated to do. Now that these young revolutionaries have our attention the real work is just beginning for them, now they must create a whole new country that they can be proud to call Libya.

Angelica Perez said...

The Revolution in the Middle East has begun, and libya’s turmoil is only the beginning of what is to come. Due to this revolution there has been a huge skyrocket increase in the price of oil that may affect The United States economic recovery. Through modern technology, the revolution was organized, and has been encouraging people to stand up and fight for their freedom. I think there is hope for Libya and it’s people, I think we all look at them and are amazed at how far they have come, Leaders around the world have offered their support, including Obama who stated that the united States offered it’s full support, and was willing to help Libya put up a democratic government. I agree with providing our help by establishing a government there, we must help one another, because today we may be helping them but tomorrow they will help us.

Anonymous said...

Violence may not be the correct way to get things to change but at times it is the necessary action. Although Libyans have exhibited little to no destruction, or much violence like we are accustomed to see when such revolutions erupt. I believe that their revolt is a positive thing. Countries like the United States have proved to the world that with effort and consistency change is possible. If after 40 years under dictatorship, citizens of Libya feel that Gaddafi needs to step down from office measures should be taken to ensure that it happens. It’s crazy to think that with all the freedom many countries in the world have that there are still countries who’s citizens live under a strict and heartless dictators. Although their first revolution in 1969 was unsuccessful does not mean that the same fate is to be expected for this one. On the contrary, with the recent win of the rebels giving hope for this countries evolution.

-Tircia Melo

Anonymous said...

The revolution in Libya started February of 2011. As we all know Gaddhafi has ruled over Libya for more than four decades, and had supported the Mubarak during the Egyptian uprising. As days pass the violence rises and citizens become more violent. I believe this revolution is good impact for the Libyan history. I think Libyan people need to live peacefully and be able to be in their own country without fears every time the go out to the streets. Dictatorship has been a great affect in this country. So for them to protest for their rights and liberty they should keep up and accomplish to have a country with a government, without a leader that is wealthy and powerful as Gaddhafi. Libya's foreign minister says that “Qaddafi has exhausted all of his options after rebels take over Tripoli compound”. As a result, I believe this revolution was worth it because now the people can manage to build a new and reliably democratic Libyan state.

Nyrva Pierre Toussaint said...

The revolution within its own jurisdiction is good and also bad. Gaddafi and his 20 year rane have made Libya one of the richest places in the world. On the other hand the fact that Gaddafi has been there for nearly two decades has made the people weary especially of the violence that happens there due to the negative views of the president. My point of view is how will a country that is so used to having a dictator actually deal with it. Will the new president do as Gaddafis' done and take the role of the new dictator. The country will take years to be able to undo what ever system Gaddafi had in place.

Matthew Taboada said...

Although I’m not too familiar with politics or history, the revolution in Libya is one that can affect many people in the long run. After doing a little bit of research, I found that Gaddafi has been the dictator running that country down for a little over four decades now. As the years have progressed, the countries people have been growing tired of the dictators’ ways, so much that in the beginning of 2011, the citizens began a rebellion. I agree with the choices of these people, they deserve to live freely in their country without having to living in fear. I think that the recent victory of the rebels gives hope to the countries people that they will make this attempt at a revolution a successful one, contrasting the failure in 1969. Although I don’t believe that violence is the way to go, sometimes it is necessary if it means the greater good for an entire country.

Leon Pierre said...

Libya's revolution sparked a new beginning for the Libyans. The Libyans suffer far too long at the hands of Muammar Gaddafi tyrannical government powers and systems. This revolution that took place, north of Africa, was needed. The Libyans needed to establish a country of democracy. As we know the historical background of the Libyans, that the Libyans has been subjected to various degrees of foreign control, from Europe, Asia, and Africa. Moreover, the six distinctive periods where Libyans were being under controlled, during ancient Libya, the Roman era, the Islamic era, Ottoman rule, Italian rule, and the Modern era. As we can see, according to the modern era,Gaddafi,who has been over thrown by the Libyans, devious and ominous behavior contributions to the Libyans economical, social, political, and other aspects of the Libyans lives were detrimental and unacceptable to the Libyans. So like any other country, who would fight for their rights and for a better life, fought for their rights against the system of Gaddafi. Some lost their lives, but that didn't stop them from being victorious. Gaddafi lost his position in power and he is no more. At this rate, Libya will be at verge of being a state of democracy and freedom will embrace them.

Roger Leite said...

Revolutions happen all around the world and throughout history many countries have gone through them. The Libyan revolution is not surprising at all. It is a country whose citizens have been oppressed and exploited only to benefit their leader, Muammar Gaddafi. Gaddafi has used all money made from the country's rich oil supply only to benefit himself instead of the advancement of his country. Something that is not uncommon in many African countries. This revolution is violent like the many that were had before this one. Many people would prefer Libya to have a more peaceful revolution, but it is very unlikely. Revolutions are not usually peaceful. It is a time where citizens want to overthrow a oppressive leader and rebuild. Power is something that a leader such as Gaddafi is not prepared to relinquish. Currently he has lost power but fighting still continues from both sides. Hopefully Libyan rebels end up victorious in the struggle for change and freedom, and with help from other countries they will rebuild and be an inspiring example for other countries that are suffering like they are.

Yaidelyn Alonso said...

Being one of the richest countries because of their oil, Libya leader Gadaffi became an enemy to the United States in the 1980’s when he supported terrorist groups and terrorist actions. Although we all have different opinions and you can’t argue with politics or government, we all know that when Gadaffi came into power he claimed change and a better life for the people. Gaddafi corrupted the government by using all the money from petroleum to support his lavish lifestyle while leaving the Libyan people in poverty. What I have come to notice is how graceful Libya has been thru the revolution un-like others in which the public destroy cities and harm other human beings. It astonishes me how one country can only live up to one man’s choice, and his view on how the government should be. The Libyans understand what they are fighting for they understand that patience is a “virtue” and that change will happen for them.

Angel Castellanos said...

This ongoing revolution in Libya hopefully marks the first of many as the oppressed nations in our world realize that change is very much a possibility and that a country's citizens need not be afraid of their government because power is in the hands of the people.
It is unfortunate that such drastic measures must be taken to achieve what is hopefully a step in the right direction for Libya and its citizens, although violence is not always the answer, sometimes it is the solution and let everyone who is aware of what is going on in Libya see that no tyrant can rule forever, let this be a warning and a demonstration to the governments of oppressive countries like North Korea and Cuba, if this can happen in Libya it can definitely happen anywhere else.

Michelle Palomo said...

Series of protests to overthrow Muammar Gaddafi began peacefully, to later escalate into an uprising, and soon a revolution across the country. I believe a revolution will lead Libya into a better future, without Gaddafi’s government. The people of Libya have lost their freedom and have been under the dictatorship of Gaddafi for forty-two years. Gaddafi’s ideology is presented in he “Green Book” where he used capitalism and socialism to govern. He has sent people to prison, tortured, killed, and has had people disappear if anyone spoke against him and his reign. He ultimately kept much of the wealth to himself and left the country extremely poor and vulnerable. I think that the United Nations should definitely intervene and help Libyan’s conquer freedom and work towards a greater future. The UN issued an arrest warrant for Gaddafi, accusing him of crimes against humanity. Libya will hopefully regain power with a new government that will not lead into corruption of the country and a spread of wealth throughout.

tisha016 said...

As a privileged young person I appreciate the freedom my country has given me. I can’t
imagine how horrible if must feel to be ruled by an ungrateful leader that uses violence as
a means of punishment. Although it was said that he helped with housing, education, and
he put socialism into practice he was a man that abused from his power. When a person
is given the ultimate authority over a country they are driven to do as they please without
realizing the harm they are causing. Moammar Gaddafi began his dictatorship when he
was 27 years old and was Libya’s leader for 42 years. He used religion to brainwash
the people of Libya, making them vulnerable to the situation at hand. Fortunately, there
are countries becoming involved to assist the people of Libya raise from the prevailing
system they encountered. Because it was difficult for the people to overthrow Gaddafi
they remained calm,if they were caught, Gaddafi sent his followers to kill those
protestors. In America we are free to express ourselves without fearing for our life. I believe this country will be unstable and chaotic for the simple fact that
Libyan's are running around with no plans and everyone must realize that as we sit in this
classroom there is still a number of Gaddafi’s loyalists controlling some towns in
Libya, action must be taken carefully and rapidly. On the other hand, I still feel that this
revolution is the best thing that could have happened. The question still remains, who will
take over now and will this leader do the same atrocities that Gaddafi committed or will
this person bring peace and freedom to Libya?

Jennifer Rivera said...

In my opinion I agree with the Libyan revolution since was needed for a change in the country. Also since Libya is one of the richest countries because of it oil the people live in a very poor condition. The leader Muammar Gaddafi used all the money from the oil only for himself instead of helping the people of his country, those people that are poor and really needed, I know is poor people everywhere but, Libyan is a rich country because of the production of oil it don't may have such many poor people. The revolution is a way so they fight for they rights. After 40 years with no medical care, no good opportunities for a job is time for them to react in that way making a revolution.

yasmin tavarez said...

I think that there is hope for the revolution happening currently in Libya. Every country that has won its independence did so through rebellion against the political system they were being governed by. Every country took different approaches to how they rebelled but they all had the common goal of overthrowing their government power. Libyans have rebelled against there leader Muammar Gaddafi ,who has been in power since 1969, and so far have succeeded in taking him out of power. It started as a simple group of anti-government protestors in the streets of Benghazi and now its spread to other cities and the capital. Even though they have rebelled with violent ways it is understandable. Gaddafi has threatened his people with his troops and thus arousing this civil war. Announcing publically to a radio station that, for any rebels to be warned that they will be attacked by his troops. Libyans are at war right now, fighting for there liberty. I think they will, eventually, win this revolution because they are not giving up. The mass is greater than one. Eventually with the help of allied countries Libya can win their freedom from the regime power of Gaddafi. Like its neighboring countries that have also rebelled and have managed to remove there leader, Libya has a long way to go.

Bryant Olmedo said...

Libya's situation is under a great deal of attention. A revolution has arised in an attempt to overthrow Gaddafi who is Libya's current leader. Libya has already gone through several revolutions and Gaddafi was a successful leader and overthrew Libyas's past leader in 1969. Gaddafi has a great deal of power and money to back him. he has been in control of Libya for over 40 years. Libya obtains most of their wealth through the oil industry and Gaddafi obviously recieves most of those benefits. The revolution taking place is certainly going to provide a great deal of violence but only time can tell the true outcome of the Libyan revolution. many of the Libyan people feel oppressed by their government and now they are taking actions and fighting for what they believe is right. Obviously Gaddai isnt going to step down so he will put a fight for what he earned. many experts suggest for democratic involvement but i dont think Gaddafi is willing to give his seat up just yet.

EmperorATW said...
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Anonymous said...

Libya is on the right path to becoming a strong democratic country. Yes it is sad to see that Gaddafi the man that gave the people of Libya hope from there oppressor before him, turn out to be on the same side of the coin of his predecessor. Libya is fighting for their right to be a strong independent country “we saw little to no looting or destruction of public wealth, nor did we witness other atrocities that usually accompany such changes. It seems that Libyans realize that engaging in such behavior would undermine the very goals they have fought and died for.” This alone is a Statement to the World that all od “US” can be humane
Albert Word

Christelle Debrosse said...

Violence may not be the best solution but in Libya's case they had no other choice. The people of Libya had no voice in their own country. Gaddafi was in power for about 40 years and gave these people no freedom,they lived in the worst conditions.This revolution was a step towards a better future,there is now hope in Libya for a better tomorrow.It wont be easy but I believe the people of Libya will get through this in the end,one day at a time.

Gabriel Gutierrez said...

Last year the world witnessed a sudden yet understandable wave of rebellion in the Middle East. From Bahrain to Egypt and most notably Libya people decided they’d had enough injustice. Tyranny, dictatorships, and political injustice have existed for about as long as democracy itself but one thing that has been around longer is the human mind and its ability to make decisions and question authority. In order to successfully revolt and overthrow tyrannous leadership there must be an uprising among the people or a very intelligent leader. A young 27-year-old Libyan Colonel by the name of Muammar Gaddafi. Revolting and setting up a new democracy is not necessarily a negative thing, when revolting and setting up a new democracy is actually your intended goal. Muammar Gaddafi ruled Libya for 42 years weather officially or not. That amount of time in office alone is enough reason for your people to revolt. This man hung people in public and hosted numerous live on air killings of dissenters. I believe that the new age in technology and its ability to reach to any part of the globe has a strong role at the very heart of these revolutions. The biggest problem that faces Libya now is that they need to organize and set up a legitimate democracy as opposed to doing what so often happens after a revolution and that is to end up with something worse than what was in place before.

Andre Rojas said...
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Andre Rojas said...

To state the obvious, the revolution in Libya is definitely a start to what will be a very long and difficult process in transforming the country into a democracy. However, there are so many different situations they must go through now in order to get to where they want to be. Such is evident with all countries that try to free themselves from a dictator that has set their people back in every aspect involving their land from the political and economic standpoint. The most frightening part of this entire situation is now having to find people that are educated enough to run a country. When the American Revolution took place, we already had great thinkers and politicians that would help this country get on the right path to freedom. We’ve hit many bumps along the way, but the foundation was very strong, and it got us to where we are today.
The Libyan people have completely overthrown the government that they have been forced to follow for many years. In this transition, there could be a number of things that could happen along the way. I believe it is interesting to compare this to the transition that Iran took when Ayatollah Khomeini took power in 1979. Although he did not spend money on ridiculous materials like Gaddafi did, the country’s poverty level rose to 45% while he was in power. He outlawed everything that was “western,” he changed the constitution and completely broke down the economic structure just like Gaddafi did in Libya. But the people of Iran praised the Ayatollah and stayed under his rule until his death. My question is if the people of Libya are ready for such a change, and will they elect an official that will actually make this a democratic country and not go back on it later when the power gets to his head. Not to mention the many countries that surround Libya that will probably raise war on them now that they will be a free land. As previously stated, Libya’s revolution is definitely a great start to get them on the right path; I just believe that this country has a lot more to go through before we can start having a highly optimistic view on their future. I say good luck to the National Transitional Counsel and hope they get very far in helping Libya with all their political needs.

Karina Cabrera said...

When introduced to a new idea, there are very limited outcomes to the idea as far as thoughts and opinions. You can agree, or disagree. When this idea involves a better life to a population, many will be in favor. Once movements in Egypt and Tunisia showed positive outcomes—after the devastating road to get there—it was only a matter of time before other countries followed. Libya has been under Muammar Gaddafi for over 40 years. During this time Libya has experienced very poor human rights, and poverty. In my opinion, seeing neighboring countries break free from such ruling was an inspiration of sorts to the people of Libya. They saw that they could have a better life and be rid of the unfit rulers. Getting there will not be a walk in the park, as many have noticed. Innocent lives will be taken and the thought of failure, has no doubt, occurred—Gaddafi himself saying “[…] would not concede power to the rebels.” Since there is no turning back, my only hope for Libya is that they successfully execute their plan and that in the end they acquire the canvas to build a new, and better, country.

Gustavo Corrales said...

IAccording to what’s happening nowadays many revolutions have been taken place in Middle East countries. In my opinion I agree of what those people are trying to achieve in other words, I agree with the revolution, but it depends of the purpose. In this case even though Libya is a very powerful country with all of there oil the have, that’s a good income for the country. But the problem is their leader, he is taking over the whole country and any people feel they need some kind of freedom, and laws that make them look equal within each other this country has a sort of Monarchy. That is not good thinking about how most of the countries have democracy and have the right to choose their leaders. Everyone have a right to make choice and Libyan people don’t have this opportunity. A good example is Honduras, Mel Zelaya was trying to make this new law in which the president could be reelected and in countries like those corruption deal with most of their wins. Everybody knew what he was trying to do and that’s why many Hondurans fought to avoid the future outcome for the country. I agree with the revolution because of these, everybody have the right to choose their leader and the freedom to fight for what’s better for the majority and not for only one human being.

r.termine said...

After having their lives dictated for over forty years under the strong hold of Muammar el-Qaddafi, people of Libyan have arisen to rebel against their tyrant government and attempt to form a new democratic government. I think that the rebelling forces of Libyan have a high chance of completely overthrowing their government considering the fact that Libyan is a relatively small nation that has been able to have such a great impact and influence on the revolution of northern Africa. There is hope for the revolution of the North African countries but unfortunately not anytime time soon. In their hopes of building a solid democracy after over forty years of dictatorship, it may take years maybe even decades until they are able to have an effective government. Though, anything is possible if there is a strong enough will to get the job done.
One should never underestimate the will and power of the oppressed.

r.termine said...

After having their lives dictated for over forty years under the strong hold of Muammar el-Qaddafi, people of Libyan have arisen to rebel against their tyrant government and attempt to form a new democratic government. I think that the rebelling forces of Libyan have a high chance of completely overthrowing their government considering the fact that Libyan is a relatively small nation that has been able to have such a great impact and influence on the revolution of northern Africa. There is hope for the revolution of the North African countries but unfortunately not anytime time soon. In their hopes of building a solid democracy after over forty years of dictatorship, it may take years maybe even decades until they are able to have an effective government. Though, anything is possible if there is a strong enough will to get the job done.
One should never underestimate the will and power of the oppressed.

Nahid said...

Let me start by saying that there certainly is hope for this revolution. This rebellion is long over-due. There is a definite political issue here and how the country is being run. After 4 decades of fascism in an already deteriorated country, people have a primitive instinct to rise and make changes politically. They must seek financial growth to the masses and not just to the identities who control the petroleum. Libya’s 58% GDP comes from crude oil which was run by Gaddafi and his family for all those years. There are 20% of people unemployed and a large majority living in poverty. The military crimes and corruption have also added to the problems in Libyan culture. Public hangings and mutilations took place to those who were against the government. The Libyans have hurtfully sat back watching how modernization has exploded in many regions of their Europeans neighbors and other parts of the world while they have been living in the military’s chokehold. Technology’s influence serves them as an eye-opener to how their country is being run. It is about time that they take a stand for change and progress.

Anonymous said...

In my opinion, Libya just might be on the right path to becoming a better state because they seem to stand against the poisonous leaders they’ve had in the past. Although Gaddafi revolted against King Idris and turned out to be as bad as the king himself, the Libyan rebels have made their presence be seen and heard by fighting against Gaddafi. Although the fight against the Gaddafi defense and its military has taken a toll on the North African country and it has been a struggle for the rebels, it’s a definite win situation for the people of Libya who want to be treated as good doing civilians. Instead of being killed and tortured for having their own opinions and thought about the disliked leader, whether it’s good or bad. For Libya to become a better place for its people, it will have to rebuild its political stand point and get acquainted with the new “Free Libya”. I support the revolution in Libya even though it will take the people to get use to the new democracy that follows the success of the rebels against Gaddafi. - Azbelly Delgadillo

Cristina Martinez said...

From my point of view, marxists are greedy people to start with. Take for example, Muammar Gadaffi, the man is practically dripping in gold while the rest of his country suffers in poverty. The oil from Libya is only profiting him. The citizens of that country have every right to stand up for themselves and the rights they equally deserve to have. I support the revolution they are going through because I believe that no one should be deprived of their freedom and the technological globalization revolution that is happening now. Over the past twenty years we have gone from using tape recorders for listening to our music and books, to having mp3 players on our phones, as well as the easiest access to anyone in this world by just the click of a button. In other words, this is a new era. Counties now have an organized government system and people live a life full of choices and decisions they have to make everyday on their own. Libya's citizens, as well, deserve to win this revolution, despite their minimal population, to give them a fresh new start and a chance to have a reasonable constitution along with the feeling of safety when they are in their own home.

Anonymous said...

For a while now I have been reading headlines about the Libyan revolution but never really looked into it. Doing a little research I find that Libya was under a person who was selfish and the things he had in mind for his country weren't helpful at all. It comes to a point in time where the countries and the people in it are over the torture, how they did to Gaddafi. There's a lot of other countries that are going through this, and to think there are so many innocent people who get hurt along the way. I believe that if someone wants to rule a country, they should have in mind beneficial changes for the people living in those countries. Not pay an entertainer a million dollars to perform for them, but to use that money for the people who are less fortunate. Our times now are different, we shouldn't have a dictatorship existing in these days or people ruling a country. -N.C

Lazaro Pages said...

On December 24, 1951 Libya was independent for the first time. At the time it wasn’t called Libya it was called the United Libyan Kingdom. Libya has gone through more than one revolution. For those who don’t know a revolution is needed for change. Libya is the richest country in North Africa. But that doesn’t mean a lot when the unemployment rate is over the roof. This is an essential reason for why a “revolt” or revolution was started. The revolution that occurred before this most recent one was led by colonel Gaddafi to over throw King Idris in 1969. He gave instructions to assassinate. On top of that he ordered bombings and killings of protesters. But even though all that sounds bad Gaddafi was not as bad as a leader as his reputation set him out to be. With his power and the help of the wealth Libya obtained by their rich oil came an extension in welfare, minimum wage, affordable housing, and good schooling systems. Gaddafi gave control back to Libya. But since the arrest of Faithi Terbii the people began to rebel against the government. This is when the riots and protests came about. Throughout all these riots and protests a good amount of rebels were either attacked or even killed. So do I think a revolution is right or needed? I do think so because change is good and as long as the people of Libya keep feeling under restrain their will always be hope for this revolution.

Bayardo Urbina said...

As with all revolutions, the question I have is what is next? Now that the rebels have pushed and taken back major cities such as the capital and with Muammar Gaddafi in hiding, how does a country like Libya begin to rebuild. Even if Muammar Gaddafi is in hiding, he is still in power and has his forces fighting against the rebels. Even with the taking over of the capital, when will Muammar Gaddafi give up or step down? Of course he is not going down without a fight. The rebels have to stay strong and continue to fight if the country wants to see freedom. The first step I believe and hope is that Muammar Gaddafi steps down from power. The rebels are making great strides in taking over pro-Gaddafi cities. I hope that soon, the citizens of Libya get to experience what is freedom and free to make choices such as peacefully protesting.

abriana morisseau said...

I personally believe that there is hope for this unique event. Overtime there has been revolutions has that ended in success in other countries. I believe that in order for this to be successful Libyans must have not give up on there rights. Gaddafi has been in power over the past 42 years and during those times his people has suffered. He and his family controls most of the business of their people. Libya is one of those countries with a vast oil supply so therefore its people should not be living in the conditions that they are living in. Libyans had to suffer with less than poor medical care. With all this repression from Libyans, there was bond to be a revolution. After Egypt went through their revolution which is still going on, that made the people of Libya realize that they needed to do the same since they are not happy with their government. The people of Libya, i hope, will have a successful revolution if they continue to show their point of view and believe that they deserve better than to just live in fear.

Ashley Piehl said...

The recent revolution in Libya, although successful, draws to question the ability of the new government to lead the nation. Colonel Muammar Khadafy, the now former dictator of Libya, oppressed his people. The people of Libya were subjected to torture, beating, and cruel punishment by the Libyan government simply for speaking out against their leader and his followers. The revolution in Libya is just one more of a string of revolutions across the entire Arab world. In addition to Libya, Tunisia and Egypt overthrew their governments; which were dictatorships similar to that of Libya. After being oppressed for so many years, people all across the Arab world are looking for their voice to be heard. Although it is a good thing that the long-lasting dictatorship has now collapsed, I worry about how a new Libya will be governed. The new transition council needs to gain the support and trust of the people. It needs to give them a voice in their own government. The government and its council needs to find a way to sustain their independence and sovereignty without seeking extraordinary help from the global community. If the revolution is going to last it needs to reflect the concerns and values of the Libyan people.