Friday, January 13, 2012

T,R 8:25am

46 comments:

Diego Pinzon said...

The TIME article and the subject of food consumption and the choices we make brings up many points. A few of which we have already learned about in just 2 class sessions. The first which comes to mind is how if the greater part of the American population participated in making better food choices is a necessary condition for there to be food production reform in the U.S. If organic farms that raise free range chickens, pigs, cattle, and harvest vegetables become the dominant force behind the food choices we have at the supermarket and restaurants, and if the rules of supply and demand hold true, than suffice it to say that the higher availability of these foods would be a sufficient condition for the price of these food to come down.
The availability of these foods is so scarce that if you single out the "Greenwise" sections at Publix, the store would be narrowed down to maybe the size of one of its isles. Furthering the point, Wholefoods, aside from being very expensive for a college student who does not live with parents or roommates, is actually quite small in size, and selection, when compared to your local supermarket, thus suggesting the limited nature of organic foods in the U.S.
Personally speaking, I would make better choices in the food I buy and eat if I a) was in a higher income bracket and b) had a wider range of organic foods at the supermarket as well as the restaurants I frequent (Chipotle aside). I agree wholeheartedly with Fedele Bauccio, Bon Appétit's co-founder, "Ultimately it's going to be consumer demand that will cause change, not Washington," If more Americans start taking an interest in the health of themselves and their families, than better and less expensive food choices will be available at the supermarkets and restaurants we visit.

Jonathan Kohn said...

History has shown that for an industrialized society to successful run it requires an educated base. The reason why there is an obesity epidemic in this country is because the consumers are not educated. The reason why advertisements by companies such as i cant believe its not butter! are so successful is because the consumer is not educated. One can argue that parents have relied more and more on the government to educate their children, and so education of a healthy diet has not been passed on. One can argue that an approach that must be taken is for Americans to rely less on government providing education, and to demand more from local families and communities.
In an educated society where supply and demand governed the markets companies seeking a profit would supply the demand. This educated society would understand the concept of a healthy diet and when seeing a a commercial wouldn’t fall for the advertisement, instead would apply the knowledge and make a logical decision. The company would then shift its supply to one that would provide soctety with the product only because the company seeks profit. One can argue that the most effective way of doing is by having the nuclear family pass on this information. For example, genetic predisposition plays a major role in high levels of cholesterol in the blood, in this society the nuclear family would pass this information to their off springs, this new educated person would then develop their diet keeping in mind that they are genetically predisposed to high cholesterol. Companies wanting profits would then advertise what society is demanding (healthy food) and prodive it.

AAA said...
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Anonymous said...

Nice comments so far. Don't mind me.
atRifF

kesmio said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Elizabeth G said...

Eco-friendly methods mean less profit for big companies. Most people aren’t in the business of selling healthy products and having fair practices. They’re in the business of making money. Why invest money in healthier eco-friendly products, when you can invest the same amount of money into cheap meat, and genetically modified foods that can yield more than double the profits.
Spending so many resources to raise animals for food IS worth it if you’re a money hungry corporate food company. As long as our society continues to be driven by money, corporations won’t care how much they are wasting, or how backwards their practices are as long as whatever they are doing cost THEM less. They don’t care how they affect the environment or our bodies.
Here is one thing we can do about it: Start seeing everything you pay money for as a “vote”. If you buy it, you’ve voted that such product/company is worthy of your hard earned money. When you start to see things from this perspective it may be easier to say “you know what? I don’t think this is a great product, I’d rather vote for the product that is.”
You also start to notice when these companies are practically robbing you. Does eating meat everyday make you feel energized and pleasant afterwards? You might be satisfied, but you cannot deny that it’s unhealthy. When you start to be skeptical, you realize you’re paying to get you a step closer to all sorts of diseases and sicknesses in the future, higher hospital bills, or shorter life spans. Why are we “voting” for these companies to get rich off of our mindless food choices, and to get richer off of our hospital bills? Because no one wants to think critically about the future and how the decisions we make now will heavily influence everything around us. We’ve been right where these companies want us.
“Eco” is getting bigger and it’s good that the companies are scared, I hope they change or better yet, go away! We don’t need them and the planet doesn’t need them either.
Oh, there is always that other option… becoming a vegetarian; or at least mostly vegetarian. But these same companies have taught us that it’s unhealthy not to eat meat…

Jeffrey Roberts said...

I think that society has done a great job of brain washing us in a battle of whether meat eaters or vegetarians are right. We have survived on little or nothing and live a healthy life but now the fear of calories, obesity, diabetes, strokes, heart attack has forced us to pay more attention to not only how we eat but also what we eat. Now the battle for the customer’s money has cause a food fight on what the world think you as an individual and an inderpended thinker should eat. I believe that until we understand the fact of weather or not the giant food companies and the eco friendly veggie lovers really care about the health of the American people or are just a plot to Lind there already fat pockets. We are working 40hr a week for Food not money. Will work for food? We are over stressed and over weight and under paid nevertheless food prices keep increasing. Also farmers are getting paid not to produce, and still there are people in America that are starving, Money has over shadowed compassion. The rich get richer and the poor get poorer, Have you realize that the money that big corporation is using to stay rich is Government money not there own money, and still they do not want to shear, pay a little more taxes or help the poor people afford a balance meal, by stabilizing the price. The cost to be a vegetarians is increasing not the benefits the cost, we debate with the ultimate choice healthy eating vs. what we like to eat, is it cheaper to eat healthier or what we like? We have so much to worry about in the world now we are held hostage in a blind debate on isle 5 tiring to decide weather to have the real eggs or the organic ones and will I have enough to pay.

Cami029 said...

The article makes a lo of great points, it's also makes people aware and realize that the way American food is being brough to famillies all around is just NOT ACCEPTABLE. I mean yes I understand that in order to feed the many growing famillies in this country we must make a sacrifice, and that if we wanted our meat to be healthily and properly made it woul cost us just a little bit more of money. The wold knows of how bad the animals are treated and how disgustingly they are grown, but does anyone ever really do anything?? People talk all the time, but that doesn't stop most people from buying the cheap meats from the grocerie stores. People KNOW the conditions, but I think a lot if not most people turn the other way and "pretend" like the meat that we consume is just fine. All I want to say is why not do something about this??

Jonathan F said...

The comments above sum it up. We can all agree of the health and environmental impact our current food consumption has.
However after reading the article I am still left with unanswered questions.
How much will the price of organic and similar food drop if the switch is made, e.g from 1% of total production to 75%?
Will all families regardless of income be able to afford the "luxury" of organic food? or will the subsidies be re-distributed toward this cause?
The Gulf of Mexico is loosing $2.8B worth of fishing grounds, but how much is being gained? Marginally lost?
The article fails to provide a foresight of what it would be like once enough change has taken place.

Charles Davis said...

The article shed a great deal of light on the idea that raising a healthier breed of livestock would bring about a healthier lifestyle for nature and its surrounding elements. I agree with this wholeheartedly because when you analyze some of the ways in which the animals are being raised on the farms it's simply horrid. Keeping them bundled up, having them eats tons of garbage, using their waste as fertilizer for the lands and then, killing miles and miles of sealife is by far the most radical process human beings have ever created. The animals on those farms are ill-bred. They have no way of living healthy lives because they are experiencing atrocious living conditions. In addition to healthier lifestyles, the article as said that breeding these animals, "organically", would show gain in terms of economy. The $46 billion projection is far higher than that of the conventional method of producing food. By showing concern for our livestock we will be opening doors for healthier consumers of that produce and for the sake of our financial prosperity. Nahn Niham said taking care of the animals in a more hospitable manner is "beyond organic." This will create the line of true livestock. All they need is to be tended to in a far better manner and the affects of having them being pampered in such a way will provide for a far better Earth, as we know.

Dez Ford said...

Everyone one makes greats points but we should still remember that money is the root for these problems. You have to view this from a business perspective, in our economy the ability to make money trumps all. In a financial economy, farmers and government hold all the cards. Most farmers are not going to take the extra time to run organic farms when the mass production of goods make them more money. The faster you produce the food the faster you get paid (i,e more food, more money). Having moral values is the last thing on their minds. I agree with Diego's post, having to add If we were to address every issue in the article we would have to inevitably change the way Americans view food and in turn we would all become vegans. All in al these issues aren't going to be fixed anytime soon. I do believe that with stricter laws in place we would see change. But with the price tag on organic foods, who could blame the consumer to grab McDonalds.

Nadia S. Diaz said...

This article by TIME Magazine is an excellent eye opener to what is going on with the food industry. The cheap production of unlimited quantities of meat is taking a huge toll on the environment and our health. The way most Americans eat nowadays reassures shorter life spans and deterioration in living conditions. We are more vulnerable to diseases and illnesses due to a poor diet and so much stress.
As the article explains, the challenge of different people and organizations is to awake the public to the uncomfortable realities of how we eat. My personal opinion is that the first step towards healthier food choices begins with this awakening effort. In order for people to understand the severity of this situation and make significant changes, they need to be educated. Articles like the one in TIME Magazine should be more popular so that everyone can be put face to face with this scary reality.
Another important point to take into consideration is the obstacle that sustainable food faces. Fresh fruits and vegetables for instance, cost more than a meal from McDonalds. Sustainable foods are pricier than conventional food and harder to find.
Our government should work harder to make sustainable food accessible to everyone. Also, the way animals are raised for food should be completely altered. If animals where raised in a more natural method, the environment would not be as damaged anymore and we would be consuming healthier food.

Yanh Bonet said...

As we look back into history (preferably the age of industrialization) we find ourselves submerge in a sea full of injustice; such as child labor, no minimum wage, and no limitations in the working hours. Such chaotic system lead to a unregulated growth in cities, the population in such cities almost doubled by increasing its density, poverty reigned in the so called “Ghettos”… so the demand for food at low prices became very profitable, a new frontier for young entrepreneurs; and they came up with “Factory farming” (let’s use some terminology here). Which meaning is nonetheless “trying to get the most out of something” in this case they reformed the conditions, food, and habit of the animal to maximize profits; by adding agents that increase the development of the animal in a shorter period of time. Such conditions worsened as agriculture and biochemistry created a strong bond, and farmers found “new ways” to increase their production at the expense of the animals and quality of their product. But animal cruelty, and a deteriorating quality of food was in the shadow of other events like worker’s rights, socialism, capitalism, and tensions with the Holy Roman Empire (I enjoy history) such events affected the view of society towards that mistreatment (and let’s not forget the role of religion by cultivating the idea that animals are there for us and our needs) So society decided to turn its back on the problem and ignore the cruelty(like most of us still do). It wasn’t until 1866 that a New York philanthropist named Henry Bergh founded the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, (the ASPCA), in the United States. By then food quality was becoming a problem due to food poisoning. But the law did little to change the situation, most companies found ways to still increase their profits at the cost of an worst quality of food. So the government responded with the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act ”Wiley act” in order to directly regulate the situation. But even though it improved some of the conditions in which animals lived in, it did little but nothing to change an ignorant society that was already brainwashed by constant advertisements… and THAT is to my own understandings the main source of the problem… a society that just won’t accept the cruelty and the ecological problems that their “addiction” for food has created. Doesn’t this remind you of someone who is addicted to hard drugs? And just won’t accept the damage that it has caused to themselves and their families? Of course… it isn’t as severe, but some of the fundaments are still there. Companies are aware of this “denial” so… they respond with food which “case image” has no relationship at all with the animal it came from. Professor… please think about the following; why is it that every time you buy milk or a related product you find an image of a “well treated cow eating in some great looking farm” but when it comes to meat… you never see a face of the animal, or an image of the animal, or anything related to the real thing… why? Because they don’t want you to relate the meat, to the dead of an animal. Many communities and organizations have responded to this problem and some improvements have been made, but I personally believe that we will only change once the damage from Factory farming… is directly affecting us. Because we are selfish creatures by our own nature. The solutions? Decrease a percent in taxes to those companies that buy their raw products from “eco-friendly” farms.

Camargo Tribute said...

I feel that it is up to each individual to make their own concise decision as which foods to eat and not to eat. Though the BIG COMPANIES use strategic marketing to gain our attention and persuade us to consume their products, I feel too many people use that as an excuse for their obesity. I do believe a lot of blame is on the parents and family of each individual. If healthy eating habits are presented to youth at a young age and explained that "fast food" is not healthy and part of a complete diet, I believe that when the person becomes an adult capable of making their own decisions, they will be more likely to continue to eat healthy. I also feel it comes down to a matter of will power. Of course now it is more difficult to eat healthy food for there are "fast food" restaurants on every corner. Yet that also doesn't mean one must eat the cheapest and most accessible food. In the end, I feel it's the responsibility of the present generation to educate their kids at an early age on healthy eating. And that can only happen if today's generation started educating themselves today on what is healthy food and what is not.

Stephanie Weisson said...

I totally agree with the article. If we microanalyze the procedure that gets our food products to the supermarket shelves, we would probably not eat at all. Cows, pigs, poultry, vegetables, antibiotics, pesticides, slaughter houses, and animal cruelty all come to mind. It is such a complicated matter, but bottom line, all animals must feed and man is not exempt. However, (unfortunately) with inflation, it is difficult enough to go to winn-dixie or publix to buy groceries; so how is the average person going to afford to shop at the better quality organic supermarkets? (which are much more expensive than the average)...this being said, I believe that money, convenience, and necessity drives people to regular supermarkets, and fast food restaurants and products such as hamburger and hotdog joints, pizza, TV dinners, and ramen noodle soups, which come in cancer causing styrofoam, but are 10 for $10 (don't get me wrong, this food can be tasty, but damaging if eaten often; but unfortunately, some people can only afford that). In essence, wouldn't it be great if we could pay the same prices for organic, antibiotic-free, cage-free, and higher quality food products as I do for my regular groceries? I would like to hope so, but I don't think that's going to happen....

Mitchell Holder said...

Personally I have seen the horrific videos and read worse articles on how animals that are raised purely for food are treated, which is the issue that concerns me the most among the problems raised in this article. Also, our government should stop subsidizing corn, but they should have stopped a long time ago. It started in the 20’s when farmers actually needed the subsidies, now its big business lobbyists who ask for the money while complaining that people getting unemployment and food stamps should stop getting hand outs. Without corn subsidies, grass fed meat may have a fighting chance to be competitively priced. As far as Americans love of bacon and the like; other people’s diet and/or obesity does not affect me. Companies are always going to do whatever is in the best interest of the company, and that is to make the most money, immorally if necessary. You almost can’t blame them for this; it’s the way they were designed. Don’t expect companies or industries to regulate themselves, including the food industry. If you want fewer antibiotics in your food, you need a regulation for it. If you want better treatment for animals, you need a regulation for it. And stiff penalties for violators. Good luck getting our government leaders to do what’s right for the American people when it goes against what’s best for big business. Your best bet is to get these two interests aligned, but that’s rare if ever.

Mitchell Holder said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mitchell Holder said...

I like Elizabeth G's comments.

Anonymous said...

Elsa C Zamora

Not Wealthy Enough to be Healthy

During the last years the United States government and other health agencies have tried to educate people of the importance of having a good nutrition to be healthy. Various campaigns and programs supported by the government have tried to motivate people to lose weight and eat the right food.However, all these good campaigns and programs are no supported by reasonable prices in healthy food. It is well known that organic food, grain products and quality meats are high prices in the market. People are not only struggling with a narrow knowledge of what is the meaning of good nutrition but also struggling with high prices to become healthy or “green”. In my opinion, it is not only a bunch of advertisement with public government figures, but also an awareness of the government for food companies to improve the quality of food. These companies are killing literally people of low income that do not have enough money to obtain organic, or grain products.As the article stated, pigs raised in unhealthy conditions become sausages or bacon that eventually are sold cheap. This is a clear example that this product will be chosen by people with a tight budget to feed their families, and in future this unhealthy food will affect their health with diseases, such as diabetes and heart conditions.

A.T. said...

Are we going in the right direction? How?

Anonymous said...

A. T. the answer is probably not. A recent story emerged about Whole Foods Market was bought out by Monsanto. But the story was not entirely correct. What underlined this faulty headline was that Whole Foods, who has been fighting the USDA for stricter regulations against genetically engineered (GE) crops which Monsanto is king of, has lost part of the battle. The USDA has now removed all restrictions again Alfalfa crops meaning GE and non-GE crops will share the same fields. Through simple deduction, we know that by nature (wind) there will be a cross-pollination of this crop meaning most of the Alfalfa crops will be GE in some way.
If the USDA isn't on the side of organic farms than I find we are heading in the wrong direction of progress.

Diego Pinzon said...

A. T. the answer is probably not. A recent story emerged about Whole Foods Market was bought out by Monsanto. But the story was not entirely correct. What underlined this faulty headline was that Whole Foods, who has been fighting the USDA for stricter regulations against genetically engineered (GE) crops which Monsanto is king of, has lost part of the battle. The USDA has now removed all restrictions again Alfalfa crops meaning GE and non-GE crops will share the same fields. Through simple deduction, we know that by nature (wind) there will be a cross-pollination of this crop meaning most of the Alfalfa crops will be GE in some way.
If the USDA isn't on the side of organic farms than I find we are heading in the wrong direction of progress.

sorry, i didnt mean to hit anony...

Nadine Moltimer said...

Fast Food should not be a daily habit in any house hold. I've heard of many farms that uses tons of chemical fertilizer to enhance thier farm animals. Personally I think it is unexceptable. Major companies are buying thier products because it is cheaper and with that being said it makes it cheaper for consumers to buy thier food. If so many generations were not supporting this trend of fast food on a regular basis probably these big named companies would go a different route. This would also mean less obesity and healthier and longer lives. Its unfortunate how millions of Americans invest hundreds of millions of dollars into business that give us back only 5 percent. It should not take a visit from the doctors to make you realize that what you are putting into your body is harmful and could possibly cause you to have diseases and other illnesses. When you take a deeper look into the root of this situation the greed of money from corporations and the lack of money from consumers plays a huge role in cheap food, high prices.

Anastashia Carter said...

As a five year vegetarian, I feel that there should be more education on better food choices and other ways people can properly supplement their protien in a variety of ways. You do not need meat to survive. A lot of the food that we consume leads to pre diabetes and other diesases.(ie. high cholesterol, high blood pressure). On the average dinner plate is loaded with more meat than the important stuff like veggies. But eating unhealthy or thinking you NEED meat is a learned behavior from when we were young. Are parents cook and we eat what they cook and then as adults we tend to eat as we ate as a child and add new things that we are introduced to that we probably did not get to eat when we were young. These things are learned, so we need to learn better and healthy alternative not only to be more healthy in eating but also to better are health now and in the future.

Alivia Poirier said...

In a recent interview with NPR, world renowned chef Jacques Pepin discussed the dichotomy of American eating habits. On one hand there is the generalization of eating only hot dogs, pizza and whatever else that can easily be microwaved. But also we have made great leaps in the organic, fair trade and diverse food made available is supermarkets. In the seventies, when asking for mushrooms, one might be pointed to the canned food isle. Now we find shallots, fennel, arugula and ginger all next to each other in our supermarkets. It's not ideal, but it is also not totally futile.
Even though sub-par meat and fast food is overwhelmingly prevalent and so temptingly easy, it by no means brings any sort of satisfaction nutritionally. Ive grown up thinking food should be something you enjoy, both because it tastes good and also because it provides your body with what it really needs, not something you grab fast, eat fast, and regret fast.
The growing or raising, preperation and consumption of food are each respectfully a great part of any culture. Do we want to be represented by over crowded farms, chickens stuffed with antibiotics and food that is more fast than food?

J. Pfister said...

Everywhere in America, people are raised in confined pens of malnourishment (Wrongly Fed), packed in so tightly with all the other malnourished that any inclination of proper nourishment is chopped away by fast-food advertisements, convenience, cheap meals and the influence of peers. To prevent America from detouring from such deceitful delights, food corporations, like McDonalds, advertise healthy choices and wonderfully fresh crisp salads (Which have only 30 calories less than the double cheese burger), only to lure in those who have considered “Healthy” choices. But, as the old saying goes “If you’re going to the barbershop, you’re going to get a haircut.” In other words, for most people a salad from McDonalds will not satisfy leading to purchase of small fries, a medium “Diet Coke” and maybe even one of those little cheeseburgers- no big deal, they’re little.

It is evident most are aware of the American Food Industries and the issues they cause. But, as most things American Industries are doing wrong- like manufacturing weapons, imperialism/colonization, oh and pharmaceuticals -the people of America are also aware them. From there they become angry, three-hour activists driven to make a change, and then buy a 50 piece chicken nugget as a “special” the next day. Mr. Albert Einstein would have had a grand time observing the insanity of contemporary American’s. Nonetheless, as mentioned by other posters, a significant change in ALL of America’s current eating habits would have to occur before the slightest industrial/manufacturer change, which would allow these resources to be widely available, and affordable. It would also help to eliminate many reversible health issues caused by the consumption of food manufactured by Food Industries. Issues like: diabetes, allergies and depression.

Anyhow, scratch out the above. The true question is: “Is it worth spending so many resources to raise animals for food, when doing so is more detrimental in the long run?” Nah. What will become of this industrial food epidemic? A less healthy America?... a less intelligent America?... a less “free” America? I must say the entire above, plus much more ‘less’ than mentioned will become. I find when dealing with issues involving American Industries- ultimately dealing the American Government – the desired results of American’s arise with the movement of “the people.” Am I saying revolt against the example of degradation brought about by American Industries? Nah. What I am saying is, when revolution occurs we “the people” will find issues like “over fed, under nourished” to be addressed and most likely solved- for the most part. Conclusively, how about a little food for thought: revolution = result, “the people” = revolution, which equals results. We want results.

Jonathan Julien said...

Producers are only in the food industry for one reason to maximize profit. They do not care about you or me and our families health they just want our hard earned money in their pockets. The more revenue increases for them the more the produce with a smile on their face.

If you get a chance take a look at this article that I found talking about what is being pumped into our foods.

http://www.drdavidalan.com/weightloss/1425/food-additives-that-add-fat-to-your-body

Ralph Bonnet. L said...

Cet article écrit par circa en 2009 par circa à révélé plusieurs vérité qui peuvent contribuer au bien de la société americaine. L’élévage du cochon ne pose pas seulement un problemepour cette société mais aussi pour les petits pays que les Americains échangent ce produit. L’utilisation des produits chimiques pour l’accélération de la production, revèlent comme étant un important facteur parce que la population americaine grandis au jour le jour. Pour faire face a cet issue, pour avorter une rupture dans la consommation de la viande de porc, aussi l’importation de ce produit, ils doivent faire quelque chose.
Accélérer le niveau de la production de la viande de porc par des produits chimiques facilitent la population à acheter ce produit a bon marché et aussi à une consommation intense. Ce facteur represent un grand danger au sein de cette société aussi sur le plan environmental. Par la consummation de ce viande, on absorbe aussi les produicts chimiques qui a leurs tours font des effets secondaire sur le corps humain. Il serait vraiment important d’éduquer les personnes qui vivent sous le toit de cet influence, mais comment va t-on combattre fait? Plus de 50% des familles cette société consomment “fast food” et cela conduit a plusieurs raisons.
Je ne pe pas combattre le point de ‘’Diego Pinzon’’ parce que sans l’accélération du niveau de la production plus que la moitié de cette population aura souffert de la famine, et le niveau de la production ne peu s’accélérer que sous l’influence des produits chimiques que les companies utilisent , a moins qu’ils utilisent des produits testés au laboratories qui n’auront d’autres effets secondaire sur la santé.
J’ai pris mon temps de bien lire et analyser cet article, je ne peux rien argumenter ou prendre l’antithèse parcequ’il revèle certain verite. It is true that consuming cheap or fast food is not good for health, the point is how the government is going to process to help the people who are down the pyramid to eat healthy food?

Blair Mrachek said...

The battle between healthier, better for the environment, organically produced foods and industrially produced foods is a topic that we as human beings, especially Americans, need to have in the forefront of our minds when planning our future, not just for Earth, but for human health and longevity in general. Emissions, global warming, dependency on oil and fossil fuels, finding alternative power sources, and the production of food are some of the biggest, most crucial decisions that modern human beings will have to face. Each one of these decisions can, and most likely will, have a major impact on the survival of our planet and the human race. I agree that food production need to scale down quite a bit from industrial farming back to smaller-scale farming in hopes of creating better, healthier foods and a less toxic planet.
Unfortunately, this is not something that can be changed overnight. Money drives business, so most big corporations put profits before ethics and morality. As long as they can make more money by continuing to use pesticides and antibiotics and are getting receiving subsidies from the government to grow corn (I don't want to get into the whole ethanol thing and all the problems and money it costs Americans), it's hard to foresee any change. What needs to change is us, the consumer. If we keep buying it, they'll keep selling it. We need to bring these issues to the attention of everyone, just like Upton Sinclair tried to do with his book The Jungle. Until we all start to be more conscious of our decisions in life, and the effects that those decisions can have, nothing will change. The United States needs to get back to being the producer that we were in the past, rather than the eternal consumption engine that we are. We need to get out and make our voices heard. We need to bring back morality and ethics. We need to go out and make change happen, not sit around idly waiting and expecting change to happen. By then, it might be too late.

Andy E. said...

I have to agree with Diego Pinzon about certain points he made. people eat more when its cheap AND CONVENIENT.like:McDonald, microwaveable, TV dinners etc.
i also agree/and disagree that an obesity epidemic is because people are not educated. cause there are some that CHOOSE to eat unhealthy, cause eating healthy is probably disgusting to them, cause it is not in their system to enjoy it, even though its whats good for them.
ex: (its like a smoker who smokes, is constantly being told that smoking is bad and that person also knows that its bad, but continue smoking without a second thought cause smoking is probably deliciously addicting.)
that isn't to say that we can't change, but some people might not want to change unless forced with a situation.

Denise Monteiro said...

The first thing Americans need is to become more aware of what they eat. It seems that most of the population doesn’t care about what they eat, and how much it cost to their health and to our land field.
Every day companies are throwing more and more advertising that makes the population buy their food. They, like you said, brainwash our appetite to consume cheap food. Most of the population doesn’t even know where the food comes from.
Jeremy Seifert’s Dive! Living Off America’s Waste (a documentary): "Every year in America we through away 96 billion pounds of food, which means we are feeding our land field as much as we are feeding our country". He’s big question is “why is all this food being throwing out and not given to people who need it.” Not only changing our eating habits will help. We are facing a crisis that needs to stop. The over production of our food is one of the big problems. While millions of people are in starvation others are eating more that they need and not even eating a healthy food.
“Nearly 15 million children living in poverty in the U.S., according to the National Center for Children in Poverty. Aug. 17, 2011”
(Here is the trailer of the documentary that I talked about, if you want to take a look)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HlFP-PMW6E

Denise Monteiro

Anonymous said...

Hello, pardon my tardiness in completing this assignment.
For years I have questioned the existence of fast food or “cheap” food. I do not understand why people pay to become unhealthy and unappealing when they can find a healthy treat with the same satisfaction. It will give people this satisfaction in the sense of feeling better internally and externally. Needless to say, what is the benefit of people consuming pork and other meat products that cost so much to maintain. It disgusts me how cows and chickens aren’t enough meat supply in the food industry. The word pork in Spanish is, “puerco” and if you translate it back to English it has double meaning, either the animal or nasty. It is commonly heard to name to nasty people pork because pigs eat everything and anything, from puke to lettuce, technically what we eat is who we are. All these unhealthy nutrients are in the food we ate, not to mention the amount of chemical waste the food production uses to tender these animals. Like TIMES magazine mentioned about the chemical waste food production puts to keep the pigs fat is being brought to the environment each time they urinate. The conclusion I came to accept is that pork isn’t a necessity so why have it?
-Rebecca Soza

Darnell Jean-Marie said...

Its important for parents to educate their children on eating healthy. Children at an early age don't have much choose when it comes to food selection because they eat what their parents give to them. Many cultures in society may be accustom to eating pork from their tradition. It should be parents responsibility to learn about nutrition and teach their children the right things to eat at an early age to prevent obesity and diseases from eating unhealthy foods. When i look at the pigs being slaughtered I think about supply and demand. People want to eat pork because its cheap and they like the taste of it. Many don't know how the processing takes place and if they see that than that could be something for them to think about. Companies like this don't care about the consumers health. Its all about them making a profit. People all over the world can start developing the knowledge for nutrition so that they can teach others with their experience.

Daniel Gonzalez said...

Personally, I do not find it objectionable to kill a living organism for food. This sort of behavior is common in nature, as is other sadistic behavior, because it benefits the individual/group. A species may become dominant over other species by aggressive assertion; the more able the species is to survive (in this case by aggression), the more vigorous the population will become. What our originally omnivorous species has done is to develop tools and advanced logical thinking in order to hunt prey and keep predators at bay. I do, however, strongly object to the way the current food/meat industry operates, especially because of the way animals are treated. In the olden days of hunter/gatherer societies, I think it would be fine to assault or ambush or chase down an animal, killing it by any means necessary, because food would be hard to come by, and survival would be top priority. But we have become so advanced, so unbearably dominant, that for the many members of our species that would partake in the modern food industry, food is as superfluous as sunlight. In a world where we have much more time and energy to devote to abstract thinking and study of the natural world, I find it to be below our level of sophistication to treat animals in this way when they pose no threat or danger to us. The food industry should be changed in order to account for our empathy towards other species/living beings, though this is unlikely to happen because there is more profit to be made by cheaply housing 10,000 pigs in 20 meters squared than by giving them "humane" living conditions (until they are killed for food, which I still find acceptable). Also, poor, dirty, diseased animals lead to poor, dirty, diseased meat!

Anonymous said...

I think that what the article is saying is indeed true. We vote every time we go shopping because the food industries want to see what we prefer to eat. If we just pay the price difference to buy organic food and eat healthy instead of paying cheep prices for junk food would increase the survival of humans. Furthermore, draining pig fat into the ocean to kill millions of fish and other life forms would not contribute to the art of sustainability, something we should all practice. Raising animals in an organic practice would at least change the health of the animal you will consuming later on. Instead these huge corporations prefer to compact pigs and other animals has forced the animals to eat themselves.
-Andre, Smith

Anonymous said...

Steven Cristobol

Loved the article and I am disgusted with how this food is made it is the equivalent of poison.The issue of food ultimately fall to us the consumers the majority of Americans choose to eat cheaply and poorly,because of cost and of convince and lets face it in our current time the economy is bad you have to be able to save money in any way that you can can and fast food joints make it even easier.I myself and glad to say that I haven't had
any fast food to eat in over a year and it feels great you feel so much cleaner its like your body detoxed after getting off a drug. People want to save money and time but they need to think about saving their bodies and the animals that are undergoing these hostile situations, what kind of quality of meat do people think that they are getting a burger for a dollar it doesn't even look like meat, more like plastic and steroids painted brown and black.
This article needs to be read so people can realize what they are causing, if the awareness increases then we can start turning to a world of natural, organic, foods it would be more expensive but in the end of the day you don't put a price on your health or the lives of these animals and their effect on the environment. Increase the awareness, change the food trend, lower the obesity rates in this country they are way too high, and stop destroying our ecosystem.

Steven Cristobol

Anonymous said...

These big companies will find any new shortcuts that'll cut costs and save money. spending research money onto new antibiotics for the constantly evolving diseases rather taking the measures to give theses pigs more space to grow a naturally and healthy. Saving pennies means bringing in the big bucks without changing the prices. People keep buying as the quality is lowered after cheap implication or upgrade they've made onto the process. Filling products that make people crave it more is done to foods that are bad for you. whether it's sugar, salty or fats. Past outbreaks of diseases should not happen to often between one another. Almost half the ingredients in a generic brand are chemical used to make it taste more of what it isn't.

Andrae Williams

Jose said...

This issue has been ignored for a very long time. Obesity in the United States has not only taken over, but become the status quo for its citizens. However, I think that the heart of the problem boils down to ethics and education. I find it amazing that many ruthless business men will sit back and make millions off of a product that is killing hundreds of thousands of people.
Still, the fact that this issue affects so many people isn't only the fault of the huge corporations making millions. The lack of education of the average American is incredibly low, particularly nutrition ed. Moreover the facts about animal meat consumption are astonishing. When I saw this video, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=es6U00LMmC4&feature=player_embedded , I was appalled and disturbed at the facts and find it extremely difficult to change the way I eat. Again, this issue is more of an ethical dilemma than it is an economic one.

Michael Quinn said...

It is unbelievable how the food mentioned in this article is sitting on the plates of millions of Americans each day. What's worse is the fact that many people are adopting this sort of food into their lives as a staple. There are many ways to do something about this, for one as mentioned in the article, change food habits. This doesn't necessarily mean go to the best restaurants or buy your whole pantry at whole foods or an organic food market. But instead families can pick out something economic, and healthy that they can prepare at home, an example would be pasta. This would also bring families together during dinner, and children would grow up being used to a nice home cooked meal..instead of rushing to Mcdonalds.Eating healthy doesn't mean spending a lot of money, people just need to be educated on what to look for when purchasing food; labels can be very deceiving, passing down good habits such as these will promote a better and healthier future for the upcoming generations and make way for a healthy lunch staple.

Basil and Bread said...
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Basil and Bread said...
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Basil and Bread said...
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Horacio Delgado said...

I think this article has allowed its readers to take a pick of what is really happening behind the curtains of the food industries and presented us with some premises that single out the food producers as the common enemy that has to be stopped for the good of nature and humanity, but the truth is that these industries are nothing more than an effect from our society and way of life. We are the villains in this story. We live in a very agitated society where people seldom have the chance to stop and think about the consequences our actions can have, is all about the here and now, and what is happening with the way our food is produced is an effect of these regimen. Higher demand forces farmers to mass produce and change the traditional methods in order to achieve the goal they are required, and like every other mistake we have made, the consequences have been great in scale for both us and the environment. We are headed into a downward spiral of massive environmental damage that can only be ceased by a radical change of the American way of life and raising public awareness in the media instead of wasting money into pointless shows like Jersey Shore.

Basil and Bread said...

The American lifestyle is one of great consumption. From the suburbs to the city, Americans spend, consume, eat, and waste more than any other country in the world. Same as the American lifestyle, our eating habits are overly indulgent and wasteful. Our indulgent natures combined with the race towards earning money and success demands us access to a greater and faster food supply. This demand has caused livestock and corn industries to produce and over yield crops, turning out less nutritious food and pushing high levels of toxins into the environment. The consequences of our food consumption affect our country’s health, climate, and economics and until we change our overall philosophy to a less meat-oriented nation, we will not be able to change the food supply structure that is negatively impacting our lives and futures.
In the past few decades, advertisements and marketing have helped mold the American view on what we eat. Although organic foods have always been available, it has only been in recent years that companies have been advertising organic and all natural products. In our supermarkets, products are going “Green.” Going “green” has become a successful trend in marketing and has improved general awareness towards leading healthier lifestyles.
The overall global awareness in recent years is an important step towards changing the American philosophy about food, but faster change is needed in order to reduce the current issues we face. Overexposure to antibiotics, access waste and toxins in our water supply, and less nutritious food are only the highlights of a very long list of health and environmental problems we face from being a meat oriented nation. The best and easiest possible way to change our nation’s ideas of how we eat is through positive advertising geared towards changing our views on food. Such successful marketing as “Go Green” helps companies profit for their efforts in environmental responsibility. The incentives to participate in this trend influence the food industry's way of providing what consumers want. Through marketing a new diet to the American people, change towards a new relationship between us and our food could alter American eating habits and reconfigure the way food is supplied.
No other country in the world consumes as much meat as the United States. The idea of reducing our meat consumption requires great marketing strategies. Such marketing towards a “less meat” diet would need to resemble the “green” movement in that it would need to entice people to participate. Being green is becoming part of the American lifestyle, especially because of how accessible it has become. Such trends in our society gain popularity when it is available and useful to the consumer. When such a trend is fully acknowledged by American society, great leaps in developing change spreads across the world.
Small steps can turn into permanent habits. If a new slogan or campaign was created to help advance our beliefs on what a meal needs in order to be healthy and easy, Americans might be influenced enough to get past our obsession with having meat at every meal. Such a change as this could restructure our eating habits and demand for food, changing the food industry entirely.
- Bethany Ferraro

Luis Acosta said...

I believe this TIME article and many other articles about this issue overdramatize how bad food companies are. Yes, it’s true that many food companies out there put out bad food for the sake of saving money. However, the main problem here isn’t the companies… it’s the consumers. As consumers we have the right, and dare I say responsibility to demand high quality products from the food companies. By continuing to buy from these “low cost” companies we end up paying a high price healthwise. But if we stop buying from these companies we are giving out a message. That message is that we won’t eat this cheap unhealthy “food”. And if you’re worried about the cost of the healthy food, worry not. When the demand goes down the prices will go down. So rather than complain about how bad our food industry is and how bad what we’re eating is just stop buying it; simple as that. All of the comments I have read have been about people complaining about the food companies and putting all the blame on the food companies. I bet most if not all of these people will resume this “unhealthy” eating habit. Buying food from places like McDonald’s, Burger King, etc. We need to start taking responsibility for the foods we eat.
-Luis Acosta

Anonymous said...

Apologizing in advance if what I say is not clear.
I am all for the idea of eating healthier more organic foods. However, the reason most people eat the way they do (at least from my experience) is because most, do not have the money to buy said foods. As we all know, organic foods are more expensive. Though pork isn’t necessarily the best of choices, it is the cheapest. Pigs are not the only animal that are forced to eat corn and other foods that are bad for them, the same is done to cows and chickens, the TIMES article references the film Food Inc. in the film the audience is exposed to what exactly all the farm animals eat, and how they are treated. And you are also introduced to many families in the film, one of these families even says that the reason they eat McDonald’s or buy cheaper foods such as pork etc. is simply because they cannot afford to buy the high end produce. So do I agree with changing the way eat, and what products we should buy? Yes. However, how many of us, can actually afford to do so?
-Andres Cantey