Tuesday, April 3, 2012

T, 5:40pm

11 comments:

Andy Westbrook said...

I agree that greed played a major role in the financial crisis of recent years and that greed has always been a major flaw in human character. We always want more of whatever it is, and feelings of being content about our place in life seems to be vanishing as we progress forward. I don’t believe that markets hold the key to freedom and prosperity. I disagree with the notion that just because there is a market for something that it should then exist. The idea that company’s can pay to pollute is the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard, how about paying to become more energy efficient. That at least makes sense, doing something constructive for the betterment of society. Just because someone is willing to buy and someone else is willing to sell, does not necessarily make it such a good thing. If they could learn to bottle air, we would all in trouble.

I agree with Sandel that we are generating towards becoming a market society where we are letting our souls be infected by the masses of relentless advertising. The products we buy are defining us as people and individuals. I already see selective advertising when I browse products on the internet through pop ups on other sites. Just in case I needed a reminder of what I needed to buy. It will only get worse as technology continues to advance. I believe that the consumer holds all the power, we can dictate everything if we could mange to work as a collective unit rather then individuals. The markets only exist because of the consumers. They only feed us what we are willing to eat. We as consumers should take the initiative and stop being such consuming whores, we are the ones who need to be responsible and show that we can dictate the markets and not have the markets dictate our lives. This is much easier said than done. I am a consuming whore, I did not need to recently upgrade my iPhone, but I did, and I must say that if I were thrown in the joint and had the opportunity to upgrade to a private cell for $90 for more comfort and solitude, I think I would.

Darnell Jean-Marie said...

I agree with what Sandel had to say about having to sell your own body to make ends meet. I believe that everyone has an opportunity to get an education and when you have someone with no education then they dont have no choice but to sell their body because thats all they got going for them. There are so many places someone can work but if they dont have the skills, experience and job qualifications then they will not get hired.

People are always going to spend money on the latest gadgets. Nowadays the marketing is geared more towards the youngsters. The commercials are full of ads for kids to by from fast food to even video games. Teenagers dont have any money but they beg their parents to give them what they want.Its not just teens that are consumers but its adults to. I dont see us slowing down anytime soon because everything around us is marketable. This is how our society is based on supply and demand. If many people want it then it will be provided for us in large quantities.

Carlos Arbucias said...

When it comes to financial concerns, I agree with the article when it states that greed will always be there to affect society that can play a major role in society and that is one of the reason that moral values have greatly decayed especially over this very decade. No matter how much one gets from what they want, one will never be satisfied and that is the kind of people who don’t know the word “Limit” and that is one of the reasons why hard working class citizens are suffering for it.

But the whole point is that I agree with Sandel’s point of view. We are becoming a society in where market will rule and corrupt ourselves into a massive advertising so that people could fall into them. There is an old saying that says “You are what you eat” and it is so true and it applies well with what you buy also.

And I do agree with the person above saying that we as consumers should be the ones dictating what we need in order to prevent markets from making us consume or use what we don’t need/want.

aa said...

I agree with Sandel that we should have a public debate about the limits of the markets. I am not in favor of a market society, but instead I support a market economy. We should think and draw a very clear and well defined line that separates them, and in order to draw such, we must exchange ideas and make clear what kind of values should we have as a society. What I do want is to live in one were dignity and respect give the call, not the market. I don't think that everything should have a price. There are things that money should not buy. For example we should not treat humans as commodities. I am in favor of a good discussion about this matters in a public debate, because this clarifications will have a great impact in the quality of life, that we as a society will have in the future.

Christopher Labora said...

I completely agree with Sandel that the moral failing at the heart of market triumphalism was greed, which led to irresponsible risk-taking. Over the past few decades it has become evident that the morals that many people through out the world had taken for granted from the fat cat bankers and market controllers have eroded considerably. I find it completely appalling that companies can buy the right to pollute or that couples can buy out a women's uterus in a third world country. Just because markets exist for these goods and services does not mean that we should act on them. The greed, graft and corruption that have grown in our markets is disgusting and needs to be brought to the forefront of the of the world's population. Sandel is one hundred percent correct and I agree with him that we need to, at the very least, have a public debate about where markets belong and where they don't. It's only a matter of time before we revert to slavery in this new world. We may not be buying humans and forcing them into work with guns and weapons, but rather creating obstacles and making it difficult for many of the world's inhabitants to live without giving up their bodies to pay for the simplest of necessities.

Brittany Lamb said...

Nowadays people will do whatever it takes for them to make ends meet. Its a shame that women have to "give up" their bodies to support a child or even a home. I also believe that people have choices in life. Everyone is able to go to school whether they have money or not. There is always a way to make yourself useful in the world you just have to strive and want it. Whether its going out and looking for a decent job that you don't have to expose your body, getting a scholarship that pays for your education or even financial aid to assist you along your way to a bright future. There is always a way... You just have to look and want it!

Minggui Yactayo said...

Slowly but surely, the economic crisis is hitting everyone. People aren’t able to pay for essential things like food, water, light, or a home. I think that people are becoming desperate on how they can bring the daily bread, or more than that, they are desperate to keep up with society, what’s popular, and ‘cool’. Mentioned in the article, things that shouldn’t be sold are put in the market for people to buy. Putting a price tag to those things is immoral, demeaning, and unethical. I think that it is up to us whether to buy them or not. Unnecessary things that have no use to them, or things we could do ourselves, can be passed by and not bought. If something that’s crooked is put in the market, we have the choice to not buy them. I do understand that some are in situations where there isn’t enough money to provide for themselves or their families, but there are small jobs one can find, if you swallow your pride, do the honorable thing, and survive

Daniel Acero said...

I think that we live in a society that people have unlimited wants. We always want more, never satisfied. That's what moves the economy, but in reality we shouldn't be able to have everything we desire. We should draw a line and learn to desire goods with a more educated look. At the moment i think is hard for us to change and desire less. This is hard since the economy is based on buying and selling products. We see it everyday and everywhere. We learn this since we were little kids. As technology advances we create new products and new companies and new opportunities for people to find jobs. So i think we just have to be more educated in buying goods and creating goods to sell.

Bethany Ferraro said...

I agree with Sue Bond that the markets are less about freedom as they are about money. The choices made between the classes is not the same and unfortunately the repercussions of risk taking are not the same either. What affects the lower class is not the same thing that will affect the upper class and so I think regulations are needed to provide boundaries to keep the markets from crashing on everyone. Regulations on the actual value of the market is important as well so that we don’t have this bubble effect as our economy has just recently experienced. A market belongs anywhere that creates job opportunities and creates cash flow, however, other aspects of living should not depend on the market and I don’t think it’s our government’s position to clean up the mess of any corporation that takes risks that ends up in bankruptcy. Corporations that require help should have to show all documentation for ways they’ve tried to fix the situations in the past and why they should receive the help, number one to me would be so that people don’t lose their jobs. Regulations on all company expenses and salaries should be considered, not to restrict the opportunities but to evaluate and make sure the correct people are being held responsible. It should be considered negligent and illegal, especially when you take into consideration the amount of livelihoods that are reliant on a large corporation.

Maria A Martinez said...

If we accept the authors definition of market economy versus market society as accurate then we as a society have regressed into a very dangerous state. If We have become a market society
or if we are quickly becoming a market society we have lost or are in danger of losing our sense of morality to greed. the danger is that we could end up as we were during the days of the Roman Empire where people and not just goods and services were bought and sold at whatever prices the market allowed. Becoming a market society would or could allow the purchase and sale of endless items, services or influence, etc ! The risk is that without a debate about the moral limits of the markets we can quickly end up as a society of those that have and those that have not!

Tara Tona said...

Is the debate really about greed and market freedom? Or is it directed at the moral integrity of powerful corporations? Can there be such a thing as moral integrity applied to a non-human entity? This question, I would offer, is an integral part of the issue. There is far too much airspace between the functions of a company and the responsibility of the individuals who run it. Prior to the industrial revolution, and even many years into the 20th century, individuals (meaning REAL PEOPLE) took responsibility for the actions of their company. They were proud of their products and services, and treated their business as an extension of their own character. At some point a shift occurred, and suddenly it was acceptable for a corporation to exist as if it were a person. This alleviation of responsibility to the individual is, to my opinion, the very essence of the issues we see today regarding market morals and transparency.

Regardless of whether a company/person is "greedy" or whether or not a market exists for a certain product or service is, I think, irrelevant. If an INDIVIDUAL (the one offering the product or service) is willing to take personal responsibility for said product or service, then I say go forth. Just be transparent!